Categories
Recommended Posts
Elul Thoughts-Ki Teitzei By on


Chasdei Hashem: The Three Crowns: Three Types of Acquisition



The Eleventh of Kislev is the Yahrtzeit of Rabbi Moshe Mordechai Margolis of Krakow, author of Chasdei Hashem, a powerful book on the Thirteen Attributes of Mercy. He passed away on December 12, 1615.

“For this commandment that I command you today – it is not hidden from you and it is not distant. It is not in heaven, for you to say, ‘Who can ascend to the heaven for us and take it for us, so that we can listen to it and perform it?’ Nor is it across the sea, for you to say, ‘Who can cross to the other side of the sea for us and take it for us, so that we can listen to it and perform it?’ Rather, the matter is very near to you – in your mouth and your heart – to perform it.” (Deuteronomy 30:11-14)

There are three different ways to acquire different things: Some things are absolutely necessary for life and one will receive it simply by requesting it. Other things are possible, and one can never be sure that his request will be granted. The final category includes things that are only available to certain people who are adequately prepared to receive them.

These three categories correspond to the Three Crowns: The Crown of Kehuna (The Priesthood), the Crown of Malchut – Kingship, and the Crown of Torah.

Only the descendants of Aharon HaKohen can receive The Crown of Kehuna. Just as there is a permanent and absolute barrier between day and night, so too, there is an uncrossable barrier between a “zar” – one who is not a descendant of Aharon – and the Crown of Kehuna. This is the third category described above.

The second category of acquisition, the category of “Possibility” describes the acquisition of the Crown of Malchut. All of Israel potentially has a royal status. This Crown is available and only depends on our commitment to acquire her.

The category of absolute necessity describes the Crown of Torah, for it is absolutely necessary for existence and is accessible to all who request it.

(Chasdei Hashem, Introduction)

Go Back to Previous Page

  • Other visitors also read